How to resolve Event ID 1000 error in Windows 7, 8 and 10?

June 2, 2020 |

greater than 18 minutes

In recent times, many gamers and users of heavy editing tools on Windows have complained of frequent application crashes with event ID 1000. Many people started getting the issue after upgrading hardware components or moving to a higher Windows version.

The event ID 1000 error is so named because that is the error code that shows up when a log of the application crash is accessed through Event Viewer. Irrespective of the code, what really concerns the user is that they are unable to run their favorite games and apps after an upgrade.

The main reason for this error can be attributed to bad or faulty graphics card drivers which make the dedicated or integrated GPU to not be able to render the app or game correctly, leading to the crash. Outdated firmware can also cause it because of the absence of the latest patches and fixes for security vulnerabilities. Another possible cause of the event ID 1000 application error is malware that interferes with the ability of the system to correctly parse the app during runtime. A fourth possible reason is corrupt or missing system files that are essential for the OS to run optimally. Application, service or startup item interference cannot be ruled out either. If there is conflict between game files and other installed items, it can cause the game or app to crash, yielding instead the event ID 1000 error.

One interesting thing about this error is that it has been discovered. In Windows 10, 8.1 and 7. This rules out OS version-specific maladies unless we consider the fact that the other versions aren’t as secure as Windows 10.

How to Fix the Event 1000 Application Error in Windows

We assume you’re reading this guide because you need solutions to your game crashing with the Event ID 1000 code. So, how do you fix crashing to event ID 1000 in Windows?

Below are solutions gathered from extensive research into this issue. They are the result of personal inquiry and testimonies of others for whom the solution proved effective.

You can approach the solutions from any angle and use them in any other. One of them should work for you.

Update the Operating System

Windows might claim, with some justification, that it is currently the best operating system there is. After all, it is able to work on hardware created by many different manufacturers unlike Mac which only works on one PC model, the MacBook.

Even so being the best doesn’t mean there are no bugs. Windows 7 had a lot of bugs during its heyday and the tradition has carried over to basically every build of Windows 10. While each feature improvement and system enhancement is nice, little glitches can still pop up now and then to kill the mood.

The Windows Event Viewer application crashing error is one of these annoying issues that just seem like they won’t go away. The reason they are happening is even less obvious. They just show up at random with seemingly neither rhyme nor reason that the distraught user can easily determine.

One way to make the issue go away is to update the operating system. If you are on Windows. 7 or 8, it may or may not mean you should move to Windows 10. After all, the issue also happens to users on Microsoft’s latest OS. What you can do is install the latest build of your Windows version which will likely contain bug fixes and performance improvements for earlier builds.

And if you use Windows 10, the same rule applies. Each new build provides the benefit of extra programs and settings to play with and get excited about. More importantly, they patch discovered bugs and glitches. Incremental or minor updates can serve the same purpose. You can read the update sheet or change log for an update to know what you will be getting after installing it.

Whether you’re using Windows 7, 8.1 or 10, the process of updating Windows is similar. You check for updates and download available updates from the Microsoft server. Once that is done, you either begin the update process immediately or schedule it for the next time you turn off the system.

  • In your Windows version, press the Windows Logo key.
  • Type “Windows update” in the Start Menu and select the top result. The selected result should be “Windows Update settings”.
  • This opens the Windows Update screen. In Windows 10, this is within the Settings app. In Windows. 8.1 and 7, it is part of the Control Panel.
  • Click the “Check for updates” button.

If an update is available, the system downloads it and prompts you to begin the installation. You can postpone it to the next shutdown if you still have things to do with your computer at the moment.

After the update is complete, you shouldn’t experience any more errors that give rise to the event ID 1000 crashes.

Note that you can also upgrade the OS from Windows 7 to 8.1 or 10, or from Windows 8.1 to Windows 10. This will automatically eliminate a lot of errors associated with the older Windows versions.

Update Graphics Card Drivers

When your game or system crashes to event ID 1000, bad broken or missing drivers should be uppermost on your mind. It really is usually that simple. The crashing is likely due to drivers that don’t work anymore. As a result, the GPU is unable to work optimally like before, leading to various problems including the one you’re currently dealing with.

The solution? To upgrade the driver of course. There are various ways to do this seemingly simple task, each with its own pros and cons. You can use Windows Update, rely on the Device Manager within Windows, or utilize the services of a driver update tool.

In the previous section, we mentioned how Windows updates bring the latest patches and fixes. One thing they also do is install the latest drivers for your hardware. Since the GPU market is mostly dominated by Nvidia, AMD and Intel, the drivers for the hardware those three make are usually included in feature builds of Windows. At minimum, each update will contain the latest driver for the processor.

Even so, relying on Windows Update for the latest drivers isn’t a foolproof method. The update may be late or the driver you need may not be included.

  • Update with Device Manager

With the inbuilt Device Manager in Windows, you can update the driver for any hardware. All the hardware on your computer is listed there. All you have to do is find the hardware and update its driver. Of course, whether the driver update process succeeds depends on if Windows can find the given driver or if there is an updated version of the current driver in the first place.

To update your graphics card driver with Device Manager, do the following:

  • Open the Device Manager. Either search for it in the Start Menu or select it from the Quick Access menu in Windows 10 and 8.1 (Win Key+X). You can also launch it through “devmgr.msc” (without quotes) in the Run box in all Windows versions.
  • In Device Manager, find the Display Adapter heading and expand it to reveal the options below it. Expand by either clicking the right-facing arrow or double-clicking the heading itself.
  • If you have an integrated graphics card, you will find it here. If you have a dedicated GPU as well, you will find both here.
  • Right-click the graphics card you wish tí update and select Update Device Driver/Update Driver, depending on your version of Windows.
  • On the next pop-up screen, select the option to “Search automatically for updated driver software”.
  • Device Manager will begin looking for an updated version of the driver for your graphics card. If there are multiple newer versions, it may download the next update rather than the latest and you may have to run the update multiple times.
  • If the Device Manager finds a compatible driver, it proceeds with the update and informs you that “Windows has successfully updated your drivers”. At this point, you can reboot the machine.
  • If the Device Manager doesn’t find a newer update it tells you that your current driver is up to date.

Even though this method ensures only compatible drivers get onto your system, it has its limitations. Windows may not be able to detect the most recent updates and you cannot update more than one driver at a time.

  • Update with a Third-Party Software

Driver update tools give you the option to automatically update every obsolete hardware driver on your system, and not just the graphics card drivers. This is a very efficient method, although you will have to pay a small fee to acquire a license in most cases.

We recommend Auslogics Driver Updater for the simple reason that it uses only official driver versions made specifically for your device type and model. Moreover, this tool backs up your current drivers before it starts updating them so you can roll back if something goes wrong after the update.

Check Your System Specifications

Some games and apps crash to event ID 1000 simply because they are putting the system hardware under too much strain. Normally, you will be able to find the system requirements for a program or game you want to download. If you still go ahead and install one despite your system not meeting all the requirements, you only have yourself to blame if you start experiencing crashes.

Using GPU optimizers and the likes isn’t really a permanent solution either. Those tools merely increase the strain on the hardware. It is better to use a PC that meets the requirement of the app or game. You can either buy or borrow one or upgrade the parts that need upgrading.

Of course some upgrades are easier than others. If the missing requirement involves the OS, you can easily upgrade from your current OS to Windows 10. A CPU upgrade, however, is a whole different kettle of fish.

Perform a Clean Boot

If applications keep crashing or displaying application errors in Event Viewer despite your best efforts at troubleshooting, you can try a clean boot to resolve the issue. It is possible that another application conflicts with the program and hence causes the latter to keep crashing. The issue could also result from the presence of a conflicting driver, service or startup program.

To figure out if this is the case, clean boot is the way to go. Booting into clean boot means you’re loading Windows with most of the third-party drivers, services and startup items disabled. It is note or less Safe Mode with more granular controls. While Safe Mode disables everything with the possible exception of network drivers, in clean boot, you can decide which non-Microsoft service or startup item you wish to disable. This enables you to to progressively hone in one the troublesome item.

You can boot into clean boot on Windows 7, 8.1 or 10 but the procedure is somewhat different for the latter two versions. Also, make sure you’re logged into an administrator account before you begin the procedure. This is to avoid possible conflicts that can cause further complications.

Booting into Clean Boot in Windows 7

  • Open the Run box type “msconfig” (without quotes). Click OK or hit the Enter key while holding the Ctrl and Shift buttons at the same time. This will run System Configuration in administrative mode.
  • In the General tab of the System Configuration window under Selective Startup, untick the “Load startup items” checkbox and click Apply.
  • Switch to the Services tab and tick the “Hide all Microsoft services” checkbox. This will remove all first-party services from the list.
  • Next, click the “Disable all” button to untick all the available services and then click Apply.
  • Next, move to the Startup tab and untick the checkboxes next to all the startup items here. This will stop them from running automatically when you boot up Windows.
  • Now, click OK and then click Restart when the System Configuration restart pop-up shows up. Windows will reboot into a “clean” environment.

Booting into Clean Boot in Windows 10 and 8.1

  • Open the Run box type “msconfig” (without quotes). Click OK or hit the Enter key while holding the Ctrl and Shift buttons at the same time. This will run System Configuration in administrative mode.
  • In the General tab of the System Configuration window under Selective Startup, untick the “Load startup items” checkbox and click Apply.
  • Switch to the Services tab and tick the “Hide all Microsoft services” checkbox. This will remove all first-party services from the list.
  • Next, click the “Disable all” button to untick all the available services and then click Apply.
  • Next, move to the Startup tab and click Open Task Manager.
  • Task Manager will open. Go to the Startup tab containing items that launch at system bootup. Right-click each one and select Disable until you’ve disabled them all. It’s not possible to mass-disable them so you have to do it one by one.
  • Close Task Manager.
  • You will be back in the Startup tab of System Configuration. Click OK.
  • Click Restart when the System Configuration restart pop-up shows up. Windows will reboot into a “clean” environment.

Windows will now reboot and you should log in through an administrator account as before. You are now ready to troubleshoot issues in a clean environment.

Note that while in clean boot some user functions will be unavailable until you’ve rebooted back into normal mode. Take advantage of this to carry out all the troubleshooting you need.

To find out if an application, service or startup item is causing the issue with the crashing game, run the game or app in clean boot and check if it keeps giving the application error. If it does, it means that the problem isn’t related to service or startup item interference. You can check out our other fixes.

However, if the app or game runs smoothly without any kind of errors, you’ve discovered that the problem lies with interference from an app, service or startup item. Specifically, one of the disabled services or startup programs is causing the issue. The Event Viewer can run when that troublesome item is disabled.

From here, whether you’re using Windows 10, 8.1 or 7, you can always boot into clean boot when you want to run the game and there won’t be further issues. However, that’s an inelegant solution since it means you have to be clean-booting all the time which could be annoying. A better method is to Isolate the troublesome program and take the correct steps to neuter or eliminate its interference.

The best way to do it is to enable and disable groups of services and/or startup items and check whether the program in question runs without issues. Keep narrowing down the group that causes issues for your game after being enabled until you discover the culprit.

Let’s begin with the services:

  • In clean boot, open the Run box type “msconfig” (without quotes). Click OK or hit the Enter key while holding the Ctrl and Shift buttons at the same time. This will run System Configuration in administrative mode.
  • In the General tab of the System Configuration window under Selective Startup, untick the “Load startup items” checkbox and click Apply.
  • Switch to the Services tab and tick the “Hide all Microsoft services” checkbox. This will remove all first-party services from the list.
  • Manually untick half of the available services while leaving the other half selected.
  • Click OK and reboot the PC.

After you log back in, run the game and check what happens. If the app keeps getting errors, the issue is probably related to one of the services in the lower half of the Services tab that you kept enabled. However, if the problem has gone away, the issue is probably caused by one of the services in the upper half of the Services tab that you have disabled.

Based on the result, return to the Services tab of System Configuration and enable or disable half of the services that you previously disabled or enabled. Keep doing that till you’ve isolated the issue to a single service. It could also be that you found out none of the services is culpable in the Event Viewer application error issue. In that case, you must repeat the previous steps with the startup items in the Startup tab.

In Windows 7:

  • Switch to the Startup tab and tick the top half of the startup items.
  • Click OK and reboot the PC.

In Windows 8.1 and 10:

  • Switch to the Startup tab and click Open Task Manager.
  • Switch to the Startup tab of Task Manager.
  • Enable the top half of the startup items here.
  • Close Task Manager.
  • Click OK in the Startup tab of System Configuration.
  • Reboot the computer.

Like before, log back in, run your game and check what happens . If the app keeps displaying application errors, the issue is probably related to one of the startup items in the upper half of the Startup tab that you enabled. However, if the problem has gone away, the issue is probably caused by one of the startup items in the lower half of the Startup tab that you kept disabled.

Based on the result, return to the Startup tab tab of System Configuration and disable or enable half of the startup items that you previously enabled or disabled. Keep doing that till you’ve isolated the issue to a single startup item. It could also be that you found out none of the items in the Startup tab is culpable in the Event Viewer application error issue.

To wrap up this lengthy section, after you’ve isolated the culprit service or startup item, you can take steps to stop its interference from happening again. Here are the things you can do:

  • If the service or startup item is part of a program you need but you don’t need it to start up automatically/the particular service of the program isn’t needed, you can just keep the service or startup item disabled and everything else enabled.
  • Uninstall
  • If the service or startup item is part of a program you don’t need or don’t remember installing, go to Programs and Features in the Control Panel and uninstall the program.
  • If both the parent program and its component service or startup item are important, you can check for updates to the program. This should patch the startup item or service so it stops conflicting with other applications.

When you’re ready to leave clean boot and return to normal Windows mode, here’s how to proceed:

In Windows 7:

  • Open the System Configuration window as before.
  • In the General tab of the System Configuration window, click Normal startup (to load all drivers and services).
  • Click the OK button. You’ll get a system restart prompt. Click Restart.
  • Windows will reboot in normal mode.

In Windows 8.1 and 10:

  • Open the System Configuration window as before.
  • In the General tab of the System Configuration window, click Normal startup (to load all drivers and services).
  • Switch to the Services tab.
  • Untick the “Hide all Microsoft services” checkbox. This will add all first-party services back to the list, enabling them.
  • Click Enable all.
  • Switch to the Startup tab and click Open Task Manager.
  • Right-click all the disabled startup items in the Startup tab of Task Manager and select Enable. Close Task Manager.
  • In the Startup tab of System Configuration, click OK.
  • When the system restart prompt shows up, click Restart.
  • Windows will reboot in normal mode.

Scan for Malware

Malware and virus attacks can cause no end of issues on your computer. Most of the time, they directly or indirectly have a hand in system slowdowns, blue screens, runtime errors, bandwidth depletion, spam, ad intrusions, and application crashes like those that result in the event ID 1000 error. You should be wary of letting malware gain a foothold on your PC because it can cause incalculable damage.

The assumption is that everyone has some form of protection against malware. Who would dare surf the net without at least some kind of online shield? If you’re on Windows 10, that means Windows Defender is there for you at least, assuming you haven’t turned it off.

As good as Defender is, it could be better. If you don’t have any other antivirus protection on your computer, try installing Auslogics Anti-Malware. With this tool, detecting and fixing issues caused by malware is an easy task.

  • Download Auslogics Anti-Malware.
  • Run the setup file, choosing your language, startup and desktop preferences.
  • When the tool has installed successfully, run it and commence a scan.
  • If you’ve chosen a comprehensive scan, it might take a little time. You can observe the tool as it moves through different locations on your hard drive, scanning everywhere for possible threats.

If the scan brings up detected malware, perhaps they are the cause of the frequent application crashes of the Event Viewer. Remove the threats using the given button and reboot the machine. The app or game should start working normally after this.

However, if the antivirus doesn’t find any malware, the conclusion is that the issue isn’t related to virus infection. Luckily, there are other fixes you can try out in this guide.

Run DISM and SFC Scans

The Windows Event Viewer is a default system program. It is very important, especially for troubleshooting as it shows a log of system errors and provides additional information relating to application and system events. If this program keeps getting the application error, then figuring out what’s wrong with the operating system will become that much harder.

Hence, it is imperative for a solution to be found asap. For this, we can use the System File Checker utility to possibly find and fix affected system files that could be causing the issue. If there are problematic system files in Windows, of course there will be issues. Most apps and games make use of system files. From here, we can deduce that possible errors or corruption in the files could have affected the program and caused it to keep showing errors.

Windows included the SFC utility to fix these kinds of file-related problems. As system files are crucial to how the system runs, one can’t just manipulate or modify them willy-nilly. This is likely to cause further damage, especially since these. Files are protected. With the System File Checker, the files can be scanned for errors and refreshed with fresh copies using approved methods.

You can make use of the SFC utility IN Windows 10, 8.1 or 7. Even Vista and XP can perform SFC scans through the Command Prompt.

For Windows 7 users, a straight scan with the SFC utility is recommended. However, for users on Windows. 10. And 8.1, Microsoft recommends that a scan with the DISM utility be performed first before the files are checked for errors.

DISM stands for Deployment Image Servicing and Management. The DISM tool checks the system image for bad sectors and other inconsistencies and corrects any anomalies. While SFC focuses on individual files, DISM rectifies issues with the system image as a whole.

Because of how later versions of Windows are configured, the DISM tool is only recommended for Windows 8.1 and Windows 10.

If you’re on either platform, here’s what to do:

  • Open an elevated Command Prompt window. You can find and click Command Prompt (Admin) in the Quick Access menu using Win Key+X. Alternatively, type CMD in the Start Menu, right-click the top result and select Run as Administrator.
  • In the elevated Command Prompt window, run the following command:

DISM.exe /Online /Cleanup-image /Restorehealth

This scan can take several minutes to be concluded so don’t expect instant results. The scan uses a working Windows Update feature to provide the needed files to patch the system image. In the event that Windows Update cannot be used, a running installation, bootable media or side-by-side network share from another installation can be used. In that case, you must specify the repair source when running the operation to restore health:

DISM.exe /Online /Cleanup-Image /RestoreHealth /Source:C:\RepairSource\Windows /LimitAccess

The highlighted part of the command should be replaced with the location of your repair source.

When the scan is finished, you will get a notification to that effect. You are now ready to scan the machine with the System File Checker.

Windows 7 users can join in at this point. Open an elevated Command Prompt window as described earlier if you haven’t already done so.

In the CMD window, run the following simple command:

sfc /scannow

That’s it. Windows will commence a scan of all protected files on the machine. This essentially translates to scanning the files in the Windows folder.

The scan might go on for a while. It will be even longer than the DISM scan. You just need to be patient and sip your coffee in the meantime. If any corrupt or missing files are discovered, Windows replaces them with a cached copy that is located in a compressed folder at the System32\dllcache location in the main Windows installation folder.

The process itself is only complete when it shows “100% complete” plus a message that gives you the results of the scan.

Microsoft advises that the user who just performed a scan with the System File Checker should expect to see one of the following messages, along with their interpretations:

“Windows Resource Protection did not find any integrity violations.”

This means that you do not have any missing or corrupted system files.

“Windows Resource Protection could not perform the requested operation.”

To resolve this problem, perform the System File Checker scan in safe mode, and make sure that the PendingDeletes and PendingRenames folders exist under %WinDir%\WinSxS\Temp.

“Windows Resource Protection found corrupt files and successfully repaired them. Details are included in the CBS.Log %WinDir%\Logs\CBS\CBS.log.”

To view the detailed information about the system file scan and restoration, go to How to view details of the System File Checker process.

” Windows Resource Protection found corrupt files but was unable to fix some of them. Details are included in the CBS.Log %WinDir%\Logs\CBS\CBS.log.”

To repair the corrupted files manually, view details of the System File Checker process to find the corrupted file, and then manually replace the corrupted file with a known good copy of the file.

This means that if you get the third message, there were indeed corrupted system files but they have been fixed. The chances that these are what caused the application error for the game or app are high. You can check out your app after this and it should hopefully have stopped getting errors.

However, if you get the first message, it means your system files are already spick and span and the issue with the crashing app lies elsewhere. Of course, should you get the second message of being unable to perform the scan, you should try booting in Safe Mode or Clean Boot and run the scan from there.

 

Conclusion

This guide has explained how to troubleshoot event ID 1000 in Windows 10, 8.1 and 7. In case your application or game starts crashing to event ID 1000 in any of those Windows versions, you will find the solutions provided here very helpful. The main thing is to always keep your operating system up to date. Also, you should ensure that your drivers are not obsolete so your graphics hardware can work optimally with the latest available software.

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